Weapons Training

WEAPONS

Weapons2020-09-06T09:22:16-07:00

PUTTING LEARNED SKILLS TO USE | Gunsight And Dunton Ranch

  Back in the early 1970s Colonel Jeff Cooper started the American Pistol Institute, now known as Gunsite Academy. Today Gunsite is known worldwide for firearms training, from a quality facility with top notch instructors and staff. Some of the best warriors have attended and continue to train there. Recently I was invited to by Dick Williams to attend a three-day writer event held at Gunsite employing handguns. The morning started in the classroom with [...]

By |March 24th, 2021|

AMERICAN GENIUS Nighthawk Custom Hi-Power

By |November 12th, 2020|

When it comes to firearms designers, one stands out above all others—John Moses Browning. Born in Ogden, Utah in 1855, he made his first firearm at the tender age of 13 and received his first patent at age 24. During his life he designed or made improvements to lever-action rifles—including [...]

RISING FROM THE ASHES Cutaway Instructional Firearm

By |November 2nd, 2020|

After my house was destroyed by a fire on 10 April 2005, Kevin McClung of Mad Dog Knives helped me clean up my firearms so I could read the serial numbers and report them as lost to the BATF. Firemen had unceremoniously dumped them all into a pile in my [...]

$300 SHOOTOUT Buying Bargain Blasters

By |November 2nd, 2020|

Poking around the Internet a new shooter stands a high probability of coming away with one of two impressions. First that he or she is best off with a 1911, but only certain makes and models will do, and those only after sending it off for sundry modifications and reliability [...]

Chair Qual: Barricade Skills With A Simple Folding Chair

By |October 19th, 2020|

In many carbine classes shooters are shown several ways to adapt their long gun to cover to make a mid-range hit. This is often exposure to a technique, but without a great way to measure or track performance and subsequently carbineros do not sustain those capabilities to a high degree.

After Action Report: Nightmare On Sesame Street

By |September 29th, 2020|

Back in 2012 I received an email from a friend that said he had been asked to see if I would like to attend a three-day carbine class and would it be OK to forward my contact information to the instructor. My friend admitted up front that he had not [...]

  • Mantis X10

Mantis x10

By |September 10th, 2020|

A few years ago, the engineers at Mantis launched a training tech revolution with their MantisX sensor. When paired with a companion smartphone application, the rail-mount device could show you exactly what’s happening when you break a shot. Motion sensors track the most minute movements of the gun, allowing you [...]

Off Duty Capability

By |September 9th, 2020|

Fueled by media hype, mass murders have led more of our guys and gals in blue to carry something more substantial than a vestigial micro-caliber while off-duty. They’re aware it was reported it took over 50 shots from multiple officers to take down the mad dog killer at the Dayton [...]

The “High Sabrina” Actually Works?

By |September 9th, 2020|

The “Sabrina” ready position — mocked by some — has proven useful when running with a service pistol. You saw it here first: Mas as a Charlie’s Angel. In 2003 a core group of experienced master trainers including six-time shootout survivor and founder Ed Nowicki, formed the International [...]

Off Duty Carry: Are You Inviting Disaster?

By |September 9th, 2020|

When they first pinned a badge on me in 1972, carrying a gun off duty was pretty much part of the law enforcement culture. Some departments mandated it, such as NYPD and the Providence, RI PD. Most others, including mine, strongly encouraged it. Time passes. Things change. I keep hearing [...]

One More Safety Net: “The Gadget”

By |September 1st, 2020|

There are few more humiliating things which can happen to a police officer than to shoot himself while holstering his duty pistol. For decades, duty holsters and quality concealment holsters have been cut to cover the triggerguard. This was because in the old days, many cops drew their revolvers with the finger already on the exposed trigger. If something hung up, the gun and the hand and finger kept going and there would be a “bang.” What goes up must come down and what comes from the holster must generally be returned to it. If something interdicts the trigger on the way in, the trigger stops but the gun keeps going, and we have another “bang.”

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